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Back You are here: Home Renewables Wind Offshore Wind Maldives to ride the wind to escape rising waters

Offshore Wind

Maldives to ride the wind to escape rising waters


The $200 million wind farm is Maldives’s response to the
grave threat of flooding caused by climate change.

Maldives made a bold plan to source 40 percent of the island’s energy demand from wind, the largest percentage of renewable electricity of any country in the world.

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The Guardian reported that the shift towards clean energy is part of the Maldives government’s response to the threat of rising sea levels, being the world's lowest-lying island nation.

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The $200 million project will be built near Malé and is capable of generating 75 megawatts, which will satisfy the energy needs of the whole of the capital. The excess power from the facility will be used to run desalination plants.

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The wind farm is being financed and built by Texas’s Falcon Energy and will use 30 wind turbines from the American company General Electric. The plant is expected to take two years to build.

Maldives will reportedly generate roughly six times more electricity from wind per head of population than Britain.

"If a middle-income country can cut its emissions by a quarter through standard commercial partnerships, the rich world has little excuse for saying that carbon reductions are too expensive," Mark Lynas, a British climate change expert, was quoted by the Guardian as saying.

Mohamed Nasheed, president of Maldives, has committed his country’s use of biochar in order to become emission-free by 2020.

In a symbolic cry for help, Mr. Nasheed and his cabinet also held the world's first underwater cabinet meeting on October 17. The president said Maldives could achieve its aim of becoming carbon neutral well before the 2020 target.





- Oliver M. Bayani




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