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High-energy algae successfully grown at All-gas project

The All-gas project, the world’s largest projects to convert algae into clean energy using wastewater, has successfully grown its first crop of algae biomass. The European Union backed project located in Chiclana, Southern Spain aims to prove that it is possible to obtain low-cost biofuel from algae grown in wastewater. The All-gas project uses wastewater and carbon dioxide generated in biomass boilers to feed algae which are in turn...

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First commercial-scale bioethanol facility in the United States operating in Florida

Florida is now home to the first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol project in the United States. Bioenergy company INEOS Bio has begun commercial production of cellulosic ethanol at their Indian River BioEnergy Center near Vero Beach Florida. First ethanol shipments will be released this month. The Center will have an annual output of 8 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year derived from vegetative,...

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Australian scientists discover fast-growing algae for biofuel

Scientists at the University of Queensland have discovered fast-growing algae that could allow for cheaper and more efficient biofuel production. A team at the university’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience, led by Dr. Evan Stephens, has identified hundreds of native species of microscopic algae from freshwater and saltwater environments around Australia. Testing the algae out against thousands of environmental conditions in...

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OriginOil processing sewage to grow algae in Paris

OriginOil has developed a process to treat liquid sewage at the point of origin and use it to feed and grow algae for fuel. A prototype of the system, known as the Electro Water Separation system, is now installed at an urban algae demonstration site near Paris. The system generates clean, nitrate-rich water which is then fed to algae grown on the building’s roofs. “This prototype waste treatment system from OriginOil worked...

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U.S. Clean Air Act now covers biomass power plants

United States’ Clean Air Act limits on carbon dioxide pollution now apply to power plants that burn biomass, following a federal court ruling. The decision was made last July 12 by a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals which found that the Environmental Protection Agency had improperly exempted all sources of biogenic carbon dioxide from otherwise applicable permitting requirements. Under the Clean Air...

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Hydrocarbon biofuels get $13 million from U.S. Energy Department

Next generation biofuels research in the United States is getting $13 million in investments from the Energy Department. In line with the Obama administration’s efforts to cut down carbon pollution and increase its energy security, the Department of Energy has been taking steps to speed the development of clean and renewable biofuels. The end goal is to produce cost-competitive drop-in biofuels at $3 per gallon by...

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Cellulose-producing marine organism being cultivated for biofuels and fish feed

Norwegian scientists are looking at the marine organisms known as tunicates for the next source of biomass for biofuels. Tunicates are marine filter feeders with soft, sac-like or tubular rather slimy looking body structures. They attach themselves to rocks and submerged surfaces on the ocean floor and feed by sucking in ocean water and eating the bacteria and other organisms in it before expelling it back out. Tunicates...

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Logging offsets green efforts made by wood for biofuel, study finds

A new study regarding using wood for biofuel found that carbon dioxide released from logging offsets the green efforts made by using the clean fuel. The study, titled “Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for carbon balance assessment,” revealed that using wood for biofuel harvested through logging actually releases vast amounts of carbon that is stored in the deep forest soil,...

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Marine pest holds promise for better biofuel production

A wood boring pest – a bane to the shipping and lumber industries – could prove to be a boon to the cellulosic biofuel industry. The Limnoria quadripunctata, a marine wood borer commonly known as the gribble, is 1-3 millimeters in length and can quickly bore through wood causing significant natural and man-made marine timber damage around the world. Scientists at the Universities of Portsmouth and York...

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Biofuel development key to meet California’s GHG emission reduction goal

Biofuel development could be the answer for California to meet its 2050 greenhouse gas emission reduction goal, according to a new report that focuses on the state’s biofuel potential. The report titled “California Energy Future: The Potential for Biofuels,” done by the California Council on Science and Technology, co-authored by Heather Youngs and Chris Somerville, concluded that developing the...

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