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SPI Solar to acquire 360 MW worth of solar power projects in China

SPI Solar to acquire 360 MW worth of solar power projects in China

Solar Power, Inc. is set to become one of the largest solar developers in China....

Toyota hybrid exceeds 7 million mark in global sales

Toyota hybrid exceeds 7 million mark in global sales

The cumulative global sales of Toyota Motor Corporation’s hybrid vehicle have ex...

Suzlon eyes 2,000 MW of wind energy projects in India over next five years

Suzlon eyes 2,000 MW of wind energy projects in India over next five years

India-based wind turbine maker Suzlon has expressed its intent to build 2,000 me...

Solar power could be leading source of electricity by 2050

Solar power could be leading source of electricity by 2050

Solar power could overtake all other sources of electricity by 2050, according t...

U.N. chief welcomes announcements made in Climate Summit

U.N. chief welcomes announcements made in Climate Summit

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon welcomed bold new actions to addres...

Climate Summit sees intiatives and commitments

Climate Summit sees intiatives and commitments

Various bodies and entities on the Climate Summit in New York have announced the...

Climate Rally reaches 310,000 participants

Climate Rally reaches 310,000 participants

The number of people who joined the People’s Climate March this September 21 rea...

Business

Richard Flint, Yorkshire Water CEO, opens self-powered sewage works

Richard Flint, Yorkshire Water CEO, opens self-powered sewage works

Thursday, 13 November 2014

Consuming two years development time and a whopping £34 million investment, Yorkshire’s first self-powered sewage works site has been unveiled in Brad...

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Technology

New polymer materials developed for better solar cells

New polymer materials developed for better solar cells

Wednesday, 19 November 2014

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology have developed new materials for more efficien...

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Politics

U.N. chief welcomes $9.3 billion pledge for Green Climate Fund

U.N. chief welcomes $9.3 billion pledge for Green Climate Fund

Friday, 21 November 2014

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon welcomed over $9.3 billion in pledges made by Governments for the Green Climate Fund. The $9.3 billion pl...

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Living Green

How to reduce your pooch’s carbon paw print

How to reduce your pooch’s carbon paw print

Wednesday, 19 November 2014

With an increasing number of people becoming environmentally conscious, there is little wonder that several measures are being taken to bring down the...

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Renewables

IKEA purchases second U.S. wind farm to provide clean energy to their stores

IKEA purchases second U.S. wind farm to provide clean energy to their stores

Friday, 21 November 2014

The IKEA Group has purchased the 165-megawatt Cameron Wind Farm in Cameron County, Texas, from Apex Clean Energy. The Cameron Wind Farm is expected to...

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Low-Carbon

Green energy in business – Five tips for the office

Green energy in business – Five tips for the office

Friday, 21 November 2014

Make your office and employees eco-friendly with simple-to-implement advice on creating a green workplace from the energy experts at Project Lower. As...

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Opinion

Unsustainable urban life: What's next?

Unsustainable urban life: What's next?

Wednesday, 11 June 2014

Nutrition plays a critical role in everyone’s chance at a better future. Hunger, said Benjamin Franklin once, is the best pickle. Some say “pickle”...

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Climate change threatens Southeast Asian rice production

Rapid climate change and its potential to intensify droughts and floods could threaten Asia's rice production and pose a significant threat to millions of people across the region.

The issue was discussed in a conference on "climate smart" agriculture by representatives from the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security, United Nations Development Program and the Asia-Pacific Association of Agricultural Research Institutes, among others.

The conferences discussed the climate change impacts on the agriculture of South and Southeast Asian regions.

"Climate change endangers crop and livestock yields and the health of fisheries and forests at the very same time that surging populations worldwide are placing new demands on food production," said Bruce Campbell of the CGIAR research program.

"These clashing trends challenge us to transform our agriculture systems so they can sustainably deliver the food required to meet our nutritional needs and support economic development, despite rapidly shifting growing conditions."

Southeast Asia recently has experienced meteorological swings, as last year's flooding in Thailand was preceded by a record drought across the region in 2010.

These and many other extreme weather events around the world have hammered global food prices, stretching their impact beyond immediate personal and ecological tragedies.

A combined $490 million in crop damages caused by the drought and flood-related damage rippled through all sectors of Thailand's economy.

"In the fields, there is no debate whether climate change is happening or not," said Raj Paroda of the Asia-Pacific Association of Agricultural Research Institutes. "Now, we must think about what the research community can provide governments to guide effective action. Given the region's current state of food insecurity, climate-smart agriculture has to become the central part of Asia's adaptation strategy."

Solutions presented at the conference included managing the agricultural challenges presented by climate change by handling both too much and too little water, like "capturing" floodwater and using it during dry spells, as well as utilizing new rice varieties that can tolerate dryer conditions.

These climate-smart technologies deliver practical ways to help farmers cope with climate change.

The technology, known as Managed Aquifer Recharge, is already being implemented in India on a broad scale to replenish groundwater supplies that have been drained by farmers, a problem many blame on the availability of cheap, subsidized diesel fuel for powering irrigations pumps. – EcoSeed Staff



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