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Thu01292015

A.D.B. extends $100 million loan for India’s solar power projects

A.D.B. extends $100 million loan for India’s solar power projects

The Asian Development Bank is extending loans of up to $100 million to aid in pr...

Nebraska Supreme Court, House of Representatives supporting proposed Keystone pipeline route

Nebraska Supreme Court, House of Representatives supporting proposed Keystone pipeline route

Despite misgivings from the public and the White House, proponents of the Keysto...

Obama will not sign Keystone Pipeline bill

Obama will not sign Keystone Pipeline bill

President Barack Obama will not sign the Keystone Pipeline bill, saying that it ...

Senvion completes offshore wind farm over Christmas

Senvion completes offshore wind farm over Christmas

Senvion completed the installation of wind turbines for the Nordsee Ost offshore...

Vestas to supply wind turbines in Greece and Chile

Vestas to supply wind turbines in Greece and Chile

Danish wind turbine manufacturer Vestas ended 2014 with two supply contracts: on...

U.N. chief hails results of C.O.P. 20

U.N. chief hails results of C.O.P. 20

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon hailed the results of the recently ...

Manufacturer’s perspective on the new U.S. emissions reduction target

Manufacturer’s perspective on the new U.S. emissions reduction target

The United States manufacturing sector may be opting for a more diversified way ...


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Business

Technology

Advantage of green cloud computing

Advantage of green cloud computing

Tuesday, 13 January 2015

Green computing is the usage of computing resources in an energy- and resource-efficient manner. Part of it is using computers that have been Energy S...

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Politics

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Living Green

How to green clean copper sinks

How to green clean copper sinks

Tuesday, 27 January 2015

Copper sinks are all the rage these days and it's easy to see why-they're gorgeous! My husband loves copper anything and likes when it weathers natura...

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Renewables

Hereford Wind Project in Texas begins commercial operations

Hereford Wind Project in Texas begins commercial operations

Wednesday, 28 January 2015

The 200-megawatt Hereford Wind Project in Texas has achieved commercial operation. EDF Renewable Energy, which purchased shares of the project in 2013...

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Low-Carbon

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Opinion

Unsustainable urban life: What's next?

Unsustainable urban life: What's next?

Wednesday, 11 June 2014

Nutrition plays a critical role in everyone’s chance at a better future. Hunger, said Benjamin Franklin once, is the best pickle. Some say “pickle”...

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Climate change a factor in spread of diseases – W.H.O.

By Jhoanna Frances S. Valdez

Climate change a factor in spread of diseases – W.H.O.
Shifting drought, rainfall, gradually warming weather and other effects of climate change have allowed disease carrying insects such as mosquitoes to thrive.

Climate change may make it difficult for world governments to control the spread of diseases, especially the insect-borne ones, the World Health Organization said.

In a bulletin, W.H.O. climate change head Diarmid Campbell-Lendrum said the presence of warmer temperatures in the earth's atmosphere - climate models project the average surface temperature will rise by 1.1 degrees Celsius to 6.4 degrees Celsius over the 21st century - will make diseases like malaria and the West Nile virus harder to control as the climate can actually help disease-carrying insects thrive.

"Climate change is not going to invent any new diseases; it's going to make controlling existing diseases harder. We've been describing the links between climate change and health for quite a long time," he said.

Mr. Campbell-Lendrum said the erratic incidences of rainfall, humidity, temperature, coupled with a wetter weather will help boost the number of mosquitoes, as mosquitoes' survival decreases under dry conditions.

He added that shifting drought and rainfall and a gradually warming weather has made mountains more welcoming to mosquitoes.

According to him, the projected rise in sea level associated with climate change is likely to eliminate breeding habitats for salt-marsh mosquitoes. On the other hand, inland intrusion of salt water may turn former fresh water habitats into salt-marsh areas which could support vector and host species displaced from former salt-marsh habitat.

The W.H.O. estimates that global increase in malaria may be associated with a combination of deforestation, water development projects, and agricultural practices in poor countries.

"The West Nile pathogen - the warmer the temperature, the faster it moves from the blood to being transmitted. It usually takes a while for the virus to get into the mosquito's salivary glands. The biting rate also gets faster. So those things are all going to give you more transmission," said Marm Kilpatrick, an assistant professor in ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz in an article in Scientific America.

The West Nile virus originated in Africa and emerged in North America in 1999, making it a relatively recent disease.

"It's possible that W.N.V. transmission is modulated primarily by rainfall and temperature, and if so, climatic conditions in 2002 and 2003 were especially suitable. If WNV transmission is regulated by climate, then severe epidemics could recur, especially if they are facilitated by climate change," Mr. Kilpatrick said.

"The same questions we're wondering about West Nile apply to malaria and dengue," said Mr. Kilpatrick.

According to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, dengue fever is one of the world's most common disease, with one-third of the world living in endemic areas and afflicting 900 million people worldwide.

Mr. Campbell-Lendrum said the disease risks are inequitable, as greenhouse gases that cause climate change originate mainly from developed countries, but the health risks are concentrated in the poorest nations, which have contributed least to the problem.

Also, forecasts of infectious diseases' responses to climate change are complicated by the difficulties associated with predicting how ecosystems will respond to changes in climate, she said.

The W.H.O. advises world governments to increase global disease surveillance, continue epidemiological research into associations between climatic factors and infectious diseases, and improve public health training, emergency response, and prevention and control programs.



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