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Back You are here: Home Low-Carbon Low-Carbon Biz Dyeing T-shirt using no water? Adidas says it’s possible

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Dyeing T-shirt using no water? Adidas says it’s possible

Dyeing T-shirt using no water? Adidas says it’s possible
Normally, dyeing a single shirt entails using about 25 liters or 6 gallons of water.

Adidas is bringing down their water and carbon footprint with a new way to dye clothes without using water.

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The apparel industry consumes a lot of water in dyeing T-shirts and other garments, but Adidas is saying “every drop counts” and instead is using the “DryDye” technology which uses compressed carbon dioxide in place of water to dye sportswear.

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Adidas, in collaboration with Bangkok-based fabric company Yeh Group, is the first business to employ the DryDye technology worldwide. Currently, a line of four graphic T-shirts for men, women and kids are made available across Adidas’ global retail stores.

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Normally, dyeing a single shirt entails using about 25 liters or 6 gallons of water. With DryDye, Adidas claims there is no need for it.

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To put things in perspective, the company said, coloring two years’ worth of the world’s clothing would take up an amount of water equal to one Mediterranean Sea.

The process also uses 50 percent less energy and chemicals than conventional dyeing technology.

The DryDye technology is the latest sustainable innovation from the sportswear company.

This summer, the company will produce 50,000 DryDye t-shirts to promote this technology. This will save over 1.2 million liters of water, according to them.

“This is only the beginning as Adidas DryDye will be integrated into more apparel pieces over the next few seasons,” said the company.

The unveiling of the innovation followed the launch of Higg Index, a yardstick for sustainable practices in the apparel industry, developed by the Sustainable Apparel Coalition. – EcoSeed Staff



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