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Thu04242014

Living Green

‘Bicycle superhighways’ in Denmark encouraging less car use

Opened April this year, an 11-mile (17.7-kilometer) "bicycle superhighway" in Denmark hopes to further reduce the use of cars across the country, as part of a larger urban planning concept to make cities less car-dependent.

The path is the first of 26 of such “superhighways” planned to be built around the country, according to a report from Ecocentric.

Biking is already popular in Copenhagen, the Danish capital, and the city has been redesigning its streets for years to make it the norm there. The city also gave birth to a new urban planning concept due to its redesigns – called “Copenhagenization.”

Data from the Cycling Embassy of Denmark shows 36 percent of Danish adults rode a bike to work and 45 percent of all Danish children biked to school in 2010.

The bicycle highways were made to entice residents in the more distance suburbs, who still drive to work out of convenience. Once completed, the number of cyclists would grow by 30 percent – adding 15,000 more cyclists to the superhighway network, saving 7,000 tons of carbon dioxide and 300 million Danish kroner ($48.89 million) in health costs per year, according to Cycling Embassy of Denmark’s Web site.

This, however, is not the first bike-friendly initiative in the country. Bike paths across Denmark feature bike pumps every 1.7 kilometers, and “bike buses” – which bring cyclists together in their commute, with each biker taking a turn at blocking the wind for the other commuters – are gaining attention in the suburb of Furesø. – EcoSeed Staff



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